BCI technology can connect to brain signals and restore all touches of amputated patients

BCI technology can connect to brain signals and restore all touches of amputated patients

tenco 2019-01-10


BCI technology can connect to brain signals and restore all touches of amputated patients


According to the British Daily Express, artificial intelligence will soon be able to make the amputee feel the touch again by “hijacking” the brain. Hank, a moderator of the YouTube? Science Show


According to the British Daily Express, artificial intelligence will soon be able to make the amputee feel the touch again by “hijacking” the brain. Hank Green, a moderator at the YouTube? Science Show, detailed how scientists have made major breakthroughs in improving prosthetics with artificial intelligence.


In recent years, advances in technology have helped millions of amputees and have regained their physical use. However, man-made mechanical devices are always limited because the user never gets a complete feeling, which means that many things, such as taking a cup, are difficult for them.


There are reports that scientists are studying how to help patients recover their sense of touch with the help of a brain-computer interface (BCI). Green revealed: "BCI can be used to access the nervous system. There are many similarities between the electronics industry and the nervous system. The entire nervous system of the human body acts like a transceiver. In your body, nerve signals can convey motion commands or changes. Physical state, for example, makes you change from awake to sleep."


He claims that touch is the most important thing for prosthetics, because touch can tell you whether an object is hot or cool, taut or relaxed, and can help you lock the position of the object. Scientists can use BCI to connect the brain's tactile functional areas and listen to or send nerve signals.


Green explains how scientists use EEG scanners to understand how the brain sends command signals to perform tasks. The brain's discharge mode is capable of writing neural coded signals, each with a different coding mode. What researchers need to do is transform these signals into a language that can be written into a computer to perform manipulation of the limbs.


Green added: "We have seen this technology before, but recently the development of artificial nerves has enabled tactile signals to be fed back to the brain. Artificial neural systems will be equipped with sensors for detecting fingertip pressure and vibration, and Can help the user detect the target texture and determine the required grip."


Follow Me

TENCO-TECH

{"ip":"54.163.213.149","referer":"https:\/\/www.tenco-tech.com\/news\/4\/161.html","url":"https:\/\/www.tenco-tech.com\/news\/4\/161.html"}